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F1, F2, F1B?? WHAT DOES THAT EVEN MEAN?
I JUST WANT A BERNEDOODLE!

Since the Bernedoodle is a crossbreed, there are many different combinations that can produce one. To indicate what pairing was used that resulted in a particular Bernedoodle puppy, breeders and buyers alike, often use the appropriate filial generation to describe a litter. The use of the doodle generations helps future puppy families get a better idea on what to expect of future temperament tendencies, coat texture, possibility of shedding, and body structure. Theoretically speaking, a puppy from two Bernedoodle parents could look almost like a purebred Poodle or a Bernese Mountain Dog, depending on which combination of genes came into play. Even though most Bernedoodles fall into the middle of the spectrum, there can still be significant differences in coat, shedding, and build, even amongst litter mates.

 

THE MOST COMMON DOODLE GENERATIONS

Here is a quick guide to the most common Bernedoodle generations

F1 BERNEDOODLE

The most common Bernedoodle generation is the F1, which is produced by pairing a Bernese Mountain Dog with a Standard Poodle. It does not matter if the Bernese Mountain Dog is the dam and the Poodle the sire, or vice versa. Each puppy inherits 50% of the genetic make up from each parent.
In general, F1 Bernedoodles have a wavy to slightly curly coat, and they are usually medium to low shedders. Their coats require a moderate amount of grooming to prevent tangles and matting, and their build can be on the heavier side, with some F1 Bernedoodles surpassing the 100 lbs mark.

F1B BERNEDOODLE

The F1b Bernedoodle has one Poodle parent and one F1 Bernedoodle parent. This combination gives it a higher genetic percentage of the Poodle compared to an F1 Bernedoodle.
Most F1b Bernedoodles have a coat that ranges from wavy to very curly, and are low to non-shedding. Generally speaking, the curlier the coat, the lesser the chances for shedding, but the more grooming is required.
Compared to an F1 Bernedoodle, F1b Bernedoodles may have a more athletic build, which makes them excellent running buddies or candidates for dog sports.

F2 BERNEDOODLES

The pairing of an F1 Berendoodle with another F1 Bernedoodle results in a litter of F2 Bernedoodles. The features of the F2 Bernedoodle can be very unpredictable, since they can theoretically range from a purebred Poodle to a Bernese Mountain Dog and everything in between. That means that you could have siblings from the same litter, with one having a slender body and extremely curly hair, and another being unfurnished (short/smooth hair on the face and on the lower legs), and being a heavy shedder with a stocky build.

MULTIGENERATIONAL BERNEDOODLES (F3 AND HIGHER)

Any pairing of an F1b or later generation Bernedoodle to another Bernedoodle results in multigenerational Bernedoodles. Through genetic testing and careful consideration of both parents' traits, these multigen Bernedoodles can have a more consistent coat. Still, their coats can range from straight to wavy to very curly, and they can be low to non-shedding.

 

THE COLORFUL WORLD OF THE BERNEDOODLE

Here is a look at the most common Bernedoodle colors

Since Poodles come in such a variety of colors, Bernedoodles do too!
Two Bernedoodles that are the same color in genetic terms, can look completely different. Phantom markings, for example, can range in color from white/cream, or almost silver, to golden, tan, and a deep rust or red tone.

Bernedoodle color chart